Whatever the forces behind these new twists, Judge Brown has now effectively joined the ranks of Jim Garrison and Richard Sprague as those too passionate in their efforts to find the truth about the assassinations of the sixties, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Monday, 15 December 1997 11:28

The Posthumous Assassination of John F. Kennedy

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A classic and much-discussed essay which explores at length and in depth both the provenance and the evolution of these "JFK scandal stories" over a number of years: how they morphed over time at each appearance into something they were not when they first appeared.
Jim DiEugenio writes about Judge Joe Brown and the possibility of a new trial for Martin Luther King assassin James Earl Ray.
Friday, 15 August 1997 23:33

Dexter King Continues His Long March

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A report on some of the ongoing media reaction to the King-Pepper-Ray trial.
On Wednesday, June 18, 1997, Sirhan Bishara Sirhan stunned a parole board by declaring publicly that he now believes he is innocent of the crime for which he is incarcerated, reports Lisa Pease.
Sunday, 15 June 1997 17:34

J. Lee Rankin: Conspiracist?

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A declassified HSCA document reporting a phone conversation between Michael Ewing and Rankin offers, as far as we know, the strongest criticisms of the Commission by anyone actually on the legal staff, as opposed to the members of the Commission themselves, writes Jim DiEugenio.
An early report on Dexter King's meeting with James Earl Ray, which led eventually to the civil trial in Memphis in which the jury confirmed the latter's innocence in the shooting of Martin Luther King.
Sunday, 15 June 1997 00:35

Michael Baden's Deceptions

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If people like Baden feel free to lie about what is on public record, imagine the reliability of “information” they provide that can't be verified, writes Milicent Cranor.
Tuesday, 15 April 1997 23:48

The FBI and the Framing of Oswald

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John Armstrong shows how the FBI altered the photographic evidence to misrepresent Oswald's belongings as taken from the Dallas police. Included is a piece of testimony to the Warren Commission that was altered before inclusion, and copies of two letters from the IRS showing that at least two of Oswald's W-2 records of employment were forged in January, 1964.
  On November 5, 1963, Otepka was finally formally ousted from the State Department. Just seventeen days later, Kennedy would be assassinated. And the killing would be pinned on the man Otepka was trying to investigate when he was removed from his office, writes Lisa Pease.
Tuesday, 15 April 1997 16:11

Is It Ever Too Late To Do The Right Thing?

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Dexter King's call for a new trial exonerating James Earl Ray for the death of his father.
Saturday, 01 March 1997 05:14

Is It Ever Too Late To Do The Right Thing?

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Lisa Pease chronicles the family of Martin Luther King stepping from the shadows of their own long-held doubts to call for a near hearing of evidence in the killing of the great leader.
Carol Hewett concludes that scrutiny of the FBI's response to all of the mail of Lee and Marina may also help us understand the intelligence roles played by the Oswalds (wittingly or unwittingly) and may shed light on the true nature of the Paine/Oswald and the Paine/FBI relationships.
Saturday, 15 February 1997 21:27

The Left and the Death of Kennedy: Ray Marcus

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Ray Marcus's reviews of important figures on the Left, excerpted by Martin Schotz and attached as appendix B to “The Left and the Death of Kennedy”.
Saturday, 15 February 1997 18:46

The Left and the Death of Kennedy

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The articles by Ray Marcus and Martin Schotz do not so much explain the reaction, or non-reaction, of the Left to the death of John Kennedy as show, in the face of that non-reaction, that the murder of Kennedy was the first step that led to the death of the Left, writes Jim DiEugenio.
A summary of a section of Martin Schotz's book, History Will Not Absolve Us.
Sunday, 15 December 1996 21:37

No Lieutenant Columbo in Mexico City

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Lisa Pease examines the Slawson report in light of his willingness to be "guided" by the CIA, and concludes that it shows how once again the Commission deliberately ignored, misrepresented or played down evidence available to them.
The disappearance of this item which originally appeared on the (first) Dallas police list of Oswald's belongings points to collusion between the Paines and the FBI, argues Carol Hewett.

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